Summary

PROGRAMME SUMMARY [14/09/2016]

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14 SEPTEMBER

8.30-13.00 REGISTRATION
9.00-10.30
Opening session and 1st Plenary session.
Keynote speaker: Prof. Sakiko Fukuda-Parr – The New School, New York, USA.
“The Power of Numbers: a critical review of MDG targets for Human Development.”

Sakiko Fukuda-Parr is a development economist interested in human development and the broad question of national and international policy strategies. She is currently a Professor at The New School, in the International Affairs Program where she chairs the Development Concentration.  From 1995 to 2004, Sakiko was lead author and director of the UNDP Human Development Reports.  Previously, she worked at the World Bank and UNDP on agriculture, aid coordination in Africa and capacity development. Recently, United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon announced the appointment of Prof Fukuda-Parr as a member of the newly established high-level panel on health technology and access to medicines.

One of her current research projects is “The Power of Numbers: A Critical Review of MDG Targets for Human Development and Human Rights (co-coordinator with Alicia Yamin, Harvard University) – a multi-author research initiative on the impact of global goal setting on international development agendas”.

10.30-11.00 COFFEE BREAK
 11.00-12.30
Parallel sessions 1

1.1 Special Track 6 · Smart use of indicators for innovation policy.
1.2 Indicators, evaluation and policy.
1.3 Reward systems.
1.4 Knowledge Exchange.
1.5 Careers and labour market.
1.6 Gender Special session on Gender in science: a periphery?
1.7 Citation Impact.

12:30-14:30 Poster session 1
13:00-14:30 LUNCH
 14:30-16:00
Parallel sessions 2

2.1 Resource distribution and research contents.
2.2 Mixed Methods. Special session on multiplying methods in the field of research evaluation.
2.3 Special Track 6 · Smart use of indicators for innovation policy.
2.4 Special Track 1 · Data infrastructure and data quality for evolving research metrics.
2.5 Careers and labour market.
2.6 Gender.
2.7 Citation Impact.

16:00-16:30 COFFEE BREAK
16:30-18:00

2nd plenary session.
Roundtable: Infrastructures for Inclusive and Open Science and RISIS presentation
Panelists: Éric Archambault (Science-Metrix. Montréal, Canada), Valentin Bogorov (Thomson-Reuters. Moscow, Russia), Abel Packer (Scielo, Sao Paulo. Brazil), Hebe Vessuri (IVIC. Venezuela).
Chair: Ismael Ràfols (INGENIO, CSIC-UPV. València, Spain)

The infrastructure for information on S&T has a strong influence on the patterns of communication and the visibility of science. Scientific journals and the bibliographic database shape the production, circulation and consumption of knowledge.  Since the mid 20th century, science dynamics was influenced by Garfield’s notion that a small “core journals” that published most of the all the research of significance – those covered by the ISI (now Web of Science) database. These core journals of ‘international’ scope that ‘controlled’ most scientific communication were mainly published in a few Western countries. The databases were often used by managers to stratify science into high quality cores (top quartile journals), second class science and ‘invisible science’.

Since the 1980s, researchers in the global south and in some disciplines such SSH have increasingly voiced discontent about Garfield notion of ‘core’, in particular about its consequences in terms of the invisibility of ‘peripheral’ journals and the effects of journal stratification on knowledge production. For example, there have been worries of suppression of research on topics relevant to developing countries or marginalised populations which are published in local journals in languages other than English.

Also, the great changes in ICT in the last two decades have facilitated the pluralisation of scientific information. The appearance of new databases, such as Scielo or Redalyc that explicitly aim to fill in gaps in coverage. Moreover, the advent of open access technologies that can make ‘local’ journals accessible across the globe. Also new forms of science dissemination, such as blogs or twitter, or new forms of publishing (e.g. data sharing), are making scientific information more diverse. However, this succession of transformations towards more ‘open science’ poses major challenges to the governance of information infrastructure.

In this round table we aim to discuss, first, the diverse strategies for developing infrastructure with an open and comprehensive coverage and, second, the governance of the scientific information infrastructure in the face of new forms of communication.

First, current general databases have a limited coverage while more comprehensive databases are specific to some regions or sectors. Thus, most S&T indicators and benchmarking are based on conventional ‘core’ databases. Should more comprehensive databases be developed, mixing different types of science – e.g. more ‘local’ and more ‘universal’? How should indicators of these databases be interpreted? How is open access best provided and maintained?

Second, the development of robust and publicly trusted indicators needs an open and transparent data infrastructure. What type of governance should be established to ensure public critical analysis? Which types of organisations should manage the data? Should these be distributed or centralised systems?

Previous studies of standards and infrastructure have shown that deep political implications of apparently technical choices. If we aim to make science more open, democratic and inclusive, we need to be highly reflective on how we develop these infrastructures.

18:30-19:00 Transfer to the cocktail site
19:00-21:00 Welcome cocktail [Sant Miquel dels Reis]


15 SEPTEMBER

 09.00-10.30
Parallel sessions 3

3.1 Special Track 3 · Measuring diverse research “qualities”: indicators of societal impact, engagement, participation, and local relevance.
3.2 University-Industry.
3.3 Special Track 5 · Social sciences and the humanities.
3.4 Special Track 1 · Data infrastructure and data quality for evolving research metrics.
3.5 Special Track 2 · International benchmarking of innovation: challenges and adequacy for developing and developed regions.
3.6 Gender.
3.7 Citation Impact.

10.30-11.00 COFFEE BREAK
 11.00-12.30
Parallel sessions 4

4.1 Special Globelics session on Lessons learned for priority setting and indicators relevant to the impact of research programmes in Europe and Emerging Economies. An evidence-based debate between the research and the policy-shaping community.
4.2 Special Track 3 · Measuring diverse research “qualities”: indicators of societal impact, engagement, participation, and local relevance.
4.3 Special Track 5 · Social sciences and the humanities.
4.4 Indicators and infrastructure.
4.5 Special Track 2 · International benchmarking of innovation: challenges and adequacy for developing and developed regions.
4.6 Society, participation and culture.
4.7 Individual Performance.
4.8 Funding and EU collaboration.

12.30-13.30
3rd Plenary Session.
Global networks, internationalization and local research agendas: indicators for benchmarking or context specific?
Panelists: Jonathan Adams (Digital Science, London, UK), Rigas Arvanitis (Director of IFRIS, IRD, Paris, France), Sami Mahroum, (INSEAD Innov. and Policy Initiative, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates), Mónica Salazar (InterAmerican Develoment Bank, Bogotá, Colombia).
Chair: Richard Woolley (Ingenio, CSIC-UPV, València, Spain).

It is widely accepted that ‘global science’ or the globalization of scientific work, collaboration and coordination has developed rapidly in the era of mass long-haul travel and has intensified with the arrival of the ‘Internet age’. The ideal of a global science network through which access and contribution to science is no longer structured by zones of inclusion and exclusion is said to be within reach. In this so-called ‘flat-earth’ view of globalized science, physical location and local resources are secondary to international networks. Strategies for raising scientific quality are contingent on plugging into the global networks. Through these networks, countries with lower resource levels (human capital, research infrastructure, financial) are expected to  access  advance knowledge and techniques. This is assumed to lead to a faster rising level of competence underpinning the advancement of a science and innovation driven mode of socio-economic development.

Indicators of ‘internationalization’ thus become important for monitoring global connectedness as a proxy for a network model of development. Countries that map and understand their collaborations can leverage their strengths and use policy interventions to build global links in targeted areas. Indicators play an important role in highlighting opportunities and progress in connecting to key global channels. Research quality is assumed to rise in concert with internationalization indicators, lifting downstream activities and opportunities for commercial exploitation. Indicators that seek to benchmark or produce universalized measures (such as the global university rankings) are therefore regarded as relevant and seen as having positive impacts on the direction of policy development.

In contrast to this vision of global equalization, another interpretation of the globalized organization of science sees the global networks as a perpetuation of asymmetric relations of power and control over the scientific agenda. In this view, global networks mainly operate to export the research agenda of the rich and successful countries to distributed research groups in other locations. The development of a science that is not just of high quality but also of relevance to its context may be hampered by focusing on the research questions which are of interest to researchers and funding agencies in highly developed countries.

Indicator development faces other challenges according to this view that the scientific world is very far from being ‘flat’. Different types of indicators might be needed in different contexts. ‘Universal’ measures such as global rankings may be useless, or even potentially misleading, in terms of shaping policy agendas in these contexts.

Taking these polar views, we can see that the same global network could be interpreted in two very different ways. Perhaps the challenge is to find the complementarities between these two visions. Perhaps a more reflexive politics of responsible indicator development is needed. What exactly should be the role of state administrations in this contested terrain, including those charged with capturing and presenting data for S&T information systems? This session will bring these issues of the global and the local/regional into focus and into question. It will provide an opportunity for robust debate and for challenging perspectives on the received vision of ‘global science’ and the indicators of internationalization that help to construct this vision.

13.30-14.30 LUNCH
 14:30-16:00
Parallel sessions 5

5.1 Special Track 5 · Social sciences and the humanities.
5.2 Special Track 3 · Measuring diverse research “qualities”: indicators of societal impact, engagement, participation, and local relevance.
5.3 Special Session on Predicting STEM Career Success by STI Knowledge Utilization Patterns.
5.4 Special Session on Performance indicators for areas of innovation: international perspective.
5.5 Mission Oriented Research Health.
5.6 Text analysis.

16.00-16.30 COFFEE BREAK
 16:30-18:00
Parallel sessions 6

6.1 Altmetrics – Panel.
6.2 Roundtable next-generation metrics: responsible metrics & evaluation for open science.
6.3 Geography and performance.
6.4 Special Track 5 – Social sciences and the humanities.
6.5 Special Track 4 · Collaborations, mobility and internationalization.
6.6 Mission Oriented Research – Health.
6.7 Project and programme assessment.
6.8 Measuring Innovation.

18:00-19:30
[Room 1]
ENID General Assembly
18:00-19:30
[Room 2]
OEI – Ciencia, Tecnología, Sociedad e Innovación ¿Medimos lo que debemos?¿Medimos bien?
Chair: Manuel Torralbo (Junta de Andalucía. Spain).
Judith Sutz  (Universidad de la República. Uruguay), Hebe Vessuri (CONICET . Argentina), José Navarrete (Junta de Andalucía, Spain).
“this session is in Spanish”
19:30-20:00 Transfer to the conference dinner (participants OEI event and ENID Assembly)
20:00-22:00 CONFERENCE DINNER (Hotel Astoria)


16 SEPTEMBER

09.00-10.30
4th Plenary session.
Keynote speaker: Prof. Johann Mouton – Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
“The deep structure of STI indicators: Contextual knowledge and scientometrics”

Johann Mouton is Professor in and Director of the Centre for Research on Evaluation, Science and Technology at Stellenbosch University and the African Doctoral Academy. Johann Mouton is also the Programme Director of five post-graduate programmes in Monitoring and Evaluation Studies and Science and Technology Studies. He has authored or co-authored 10 monographs including Understanding social research (1996), The practice of social research (2002, with E. Babbie) and How to succeed in your Masters and doctoral studies (2001). He has supervised or co-supervised 70 doctoral and master’s students. He received two prizes from the Academy for Science and Arts in South Africa including one for his contribution to the promotion of research methodology in South Africa.  In 2012 he was elected to the Council of the Academy of Science of South Africa.

His main research interests are the philosophy and methodology of the social sciences, higher education knowledge production, sociology of science, scientometrics and science policy studies.

10.30-11.00 COFFEE BREAK
 11.00-12.30
Parallel sessions 7

7.1 Innovation in Government.
Special session roundtable on Measuring Innovation in Government, Sami Mahroum, Anthony Arundel, Carter Bloch
7.2 Mission Oriented Research – Agriculture.
7.3 Special Track 5 · Social sciences and the humanities.
7.4 Special Track 4 · Collaborations, mobility and internationalization.
7.5 Culture and engagement.
7.6 Networks.
7.7 Altmetrics.

12.30-14.30 Poster Sesion 2
 13:00-14:30 LUNCH
  14:30-16:00
Parallel sessions 8

8.1 Indicators’ use and effects.
8.2 National systems in the periphery.
8.3 Special Track 5 · Social sciences and the humanities.
8.4 Special Track 4 · Collaborations, mobility and internationalization.
8.5 Mission-Oriented Research-Health.
8.6 Special sesión on Scientific Culture Measures. Challenges and New Perspectives.
8.7 Altmetrics.

16:00-16:30 COFFEE BREAK
16:30-18:00

5th Plenary.
Roundtable on “Use of indicators in policy and inclusive metrics”
Panellists: Richard Deiss, (Directorate General for Research and Innovation, European Commission), Diana Hicks (Georgia Tech. Atlanta, USA), Slavo Radosevic (UCL. London, UK), Judith Sutz (President of Globelics & Univ. de la República. Montevideo, Uruguay).
Chair: Jordi Molas-Gallart (INGENIO (CSIC-UPV), Spain).

The STI conferences have long aimed to stimulate reflection on the use of indicators. Two years ago, in a plenary roundtable on “quality standards for evaluation indicators” Diana Hicks launched the idea of a “manifesto” that would lay out some basic principles on the evaluative use of indicators. This led to the Leiden Manifesto for Research Metrics, a set of “ten principles to guide research evaluation”. The Leiden Manifesto has become an influential initiative to raise awareness of the challenges posed by the use of indicators in evaluation and, therefore, to inform policy decisions. The HEFCE report The Metric Tide also recommended general principles such as robustness, humility, transparency, diversity and reflexivity regarding the responsible use of research metrics.  Yet, although these principles have been well received, in many cases they do not provide solutions but state desirable goals. Agreement with the principles does not imply the capacity to implement them. How can we move from general principles to more specific advice?

This closing roundtable will discuss how to address the challenges posed by the use of indicators in policy, in particular in relation to geographical, cognitive or social areas that are not well described by current indicators.

First, we need to consider how indicators are used in the policy process. There is agreement among many evaluation practitioners  that “quantitative evaluation should support qualitative, expert assessment”, as stated by the first principle of the Leiden Manifesto. Indicators and the analyses based on indicators should therefore inform but not substitute judgement. How can the principle operate in practice? Is this applicable in all circumstances? Can the application of mixed methods to evaluation help address this problem?

A second challenge relates to the adequacy of currently available indicators for assessing institutions or research against their stated missions and their specific context. The indicators community has developed sensible methods for measuring performance against some missions in certain contexts. However, some fields, such as the Humanities, or missions, such as health care, and many regions, are currently poorly covered by indicators. How can we use indicators to inform policy when they are known to be biased, for example due to the uneven topic or country coverage of databases? How should we use indicators so that local research and innovation is made visible and valued? How can we, for instance, use indicators to capture the performance of an organisation against its research missions when these are peculiar to a local context? What are the opportunities for the development and use of alternative indicators that are inclusive of currently invisible or marginalised research and innovation?

We would like to invite the panellists and the audience to share ideas and collective initiatives so that our community can contribute to a wiser, more inclusive and responsible use of S&T indicators.

18:15-19:30

STI2016 Fringe.
An open session on local examples of participatory research

  • Video presentations
  • A roundtable on quality criteria and indicators for Participatory Action Research. Sandra Boni, Ramon Marrades
18:30-22:30 CLOSING COCKTAIL & MUSIC
September 14
8.30-13.00 REGISTRATION
9.00-10.30

Opening session and 1st Plenary session.

Welcome to STI2016 – Jordi Molas-Gallart (Ingenio –CSIC-UPV)
Welcome to the Universitat Politècnica de València –  Francisco J. Mora Mas, Rector
Keynote Lecture “The Power of Numbers: a critical review of MDG targets for Human Development.”
Prof. Sakiko Fukuda-Parr (The New School, New York, US).

10.30-11.00 COFFEE BREAK
11.00-12.30 Parallel sessions 1
 [Room 1] 1.1 SPECIAL TRACK 6 · Smart use of indicators for innovation policy.
Chair: Hugo Hollanders & Lili Wang (United Nations University – MERIT. The Netherlands).
  • Introduction – Hugo Hollanders
  • Innovation indicators: Towards a User’s guide – Michiko Iizuka, Hugo Hollanders
  • Analyzing innovation policy indicators through a functional approach: the aeronautic industry case – Carolina Resende Haddad, Mauricio Maldonado Uriona
  • Assessing the performance of national innovation systems in Europe – Jon Mikel Zabala-Iturriagagoitia
 [Room 2] 1.2 Indicators, evaluation and policy
Chair: Jesper Schneider. (Department of Political Science, Aarhus University).
  • Outlining an analytical framework for mapping research evaluation landscapes – Fredrik Åström
  • When the Brightest are not the Best– Marco Valente
  • Retraction: the other face of research collaboration – Li Tang
  • The process of construction of evidences: An analysis of the use of indicators in two decisions of innovation policy – Nuno F.F.G. Boavida
 [Room 3] 1.3 Reward systems
  • The reward (eco) system of science: More than the sum of its parts?A Special Fishbowl session. Nadine Desrochers, Stefanie Haustein, Juan Pablo Alperin, Timothy D. Bowman, Adrián A. Díaz-Faes, Vincent Larivière, Philippe Mongeon, Adèle Paul-Hus, Anabel Quan-Haase, Elise Smith
 [Room 4] 1.4 Knowledge Exchange
Chair: Jan Youtie (Enterprise Innovation Institute, Georgia Institute of Technology. USA).
  • Knowledge integration through collaboration: building indicators using the Diversity/coherence and Proximity frameworks – Frédérique Lang, Ismael Rafols, Michael Hopkins
  • Using a network-based approach to identify interactions structure for innovation in a low-technology intensive sector – Camille Aouinait
  • Interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary institutions: do they constitute peripheries among cultures? – Bianca Vienni, Ulli Vilsmaier
  • “Putting in more than you take out”. Towards evaluating research based on its public (not private) contributions – Paul Benneworth, Julia Olmos Peñuela, Elena Castro Martínez
[Room 5] 1.5 Careers and labour market
Chair: Peter van den Besselaar (Network Institute & Department of Organization Sciences, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam. The Netherlands).
  • Survey on the Labour Market Position of PhD Graduates – Julia Heuritsch, Cathelijn Waaijer, Inge van der Weijden
  • Beyond the indicators: formulation of the career strategies of scientists – Eva Palinko
  • Exploring predictors of scientific performance with decision tree analysis: The case of research excellence in early career mathematics – Jonas Lindahl
  • Stability and longevity in the publication careers of U.S. doctorate recipients – Cathelijn Waaijer, Benoît Macaluso, Cassidy Sugimoto, Vincent Larivière
[Room 6] 1.6 Gender Special session on
Gender in science: a periphery?

Chair: Inge van der Weijden (Leiden University. The Netherlands).
  • Gender equality and evaluation: do fields of science matter? Emanuele Reale, Antonio Zinilli
  • Scientific and technological output of women and men Rainer Frietsch, Susanne Bührer, Patricia Helmich
  • Gender and International Mobility of European Researchers Carolina Cañibano, Mary Frank Fox and F. Javier Otamendi
  • Gender differences and the role of research grants. Carter Bloch, Evanthia K. Schmidt
  • Gender structured universities and their impact on mental health: a focus on PhD students in Flanders. Katia Levecque & Frederik Anseel
  • Gender differences in careers after receiving a personal grant. Inge van der Weijden & Ingeborg Meijer
[Room 7] 1.7 Citation Impact
Chair: Rogério Mugnaini (Universidad de Sao Paulo. Brazil).
  • Determinants of citation impact: A comparative analysis of the Global South versus the Global North – Hugo Confraria
  • Web of science coverage and scientific performance of Central and Eastern European countries – Adam Ploszaj, Agnieszka Olechnicka
  • Does size matter? An investigation of how department size and other organizational variables influence on publication productivity and citation impact – Dag W Aksnes, Kristoffer Rørstad, Fredrik N Piro
  • Do usage and scientific collaboration associate with citation impact? – Pei-Shan Chi, Wolfgang Glänzel
12:30-14:30
Posters session 1.
click to see
  1. The research activity index at the Universitat Politècnica de València (IAIP): How an institution can complement national regulation on the productivity of university professors in research and teaching activities. Conejero, J. Alberto; Capilla, José; Sánchez-Ruiz, Luis; Amigó, Vicente; Blasco, Agustín ; Botti, Vicent; Cano, Juan; Capmany, José; Chiralt, Amparo;
  2. Bibliometric indicators and activity scores for digital scholars. Mikki, Susanne; Zygmuntowska, Marta
  3. Citation impact and university reputation as determinants of success in European Framework Programmes. Piro, Fredrik; Scordato, Lisa; Aksnes, Dag
  4. Identifying knowledge production in Colombia on Science, Technology, Innovation and Society (STIS). Vélez-Cuartas, Gabriel; Uribe-Tirado, Alejandro; Múnera, Sandra Nayibe
  5. Mapping scientific controversy in Twitter: the Maya city hoax.  Denia, Elena
  6. Visibility and Impact of Research Data Sets in the Life Sciences supported by a Novel Software Infrastructure. Kramer, Claudia; Jung, Nicole; Tremouilhac, Pierre
  7. Changes in Scholars’ Scientific Knowledge Production Shaped by Bibliometric Measures in Taiwan. Peng, Ming-Te
  8. Purpose-oriented metrics to assess researcher quality; Duarte, Kedma; Weber, Rosina; Pacheco, Roberto C.S.
  9. H-index Sequences in the Wild – A Large-Scale Comparative Analysis. Olensky, Marlies; Chen, Po-Heng; Tsai, Tsung-Han; Chen, Kuan-Ta
  10. On the relationship between research topics and scientific impact: a study of edible animal research.  Castelló-Cogollos, Lourdes; Aleixandre-Benavent, Rafael; d’Este, Pablo; Rafols, Ismael;
  11. Evaluation of grants schemes in the context of the national research system based on the publication count and citation data: the grants of the Latvian Council of Science.  Kokorevics, Arnis
  12. New approaches to monitor and evaluate Science, Technology and Innovation in health: a pilot study on the Zika virus. Santos, Paula; Feltrin, Rebeca; Fonseca e Fonseca, Bruna; Barros, Ricardo; Reis, Juliana Gonçalves ; Barreto, Jorge; Martins, Fatima; Barreto, Maurício ; Lima, Nísia Trindade;
  13. Issues relating to a Brazilian model of graduate courses evaluation: the CAPES system. Vogel, Michely J.M.; Kobashi, Nair Y.
  14. Performance Based Funding and Researchers’ Grant Application Strategies. Johann, David; Neufeld, Jörg;
  15. Impact of research evaluation modes of public research funding on the development of research fields and groups in Estonia. Valdmaa, Kaija; Tõnurist, Piret;
  16. The More Funding Sources, the More Citations? The Feasibility Study of Design on “Funding Diversity Indicator”;.Chen, Carey Ming-Li
  17. Accuracy and completeness of funding data in the Web of Science. Álvarez-Bornstein, Belén; Morillo, Fernanda; Bordons, María
  18. Patent indicators for the Spanish nanotechnology domain. Jürgens, Björn; Herrero-Solana, Víctor
  19. Best-Practice Benchmarking for Israel: The SNI Scorecard – A Multidimensional Perspective. Maital, Shlomo; Buchnik, Tsipy; Getz, Daphne
  20. Conception of social innovation patterns and transitions toward the SDGs in selected World Regions: Sub-Saharan Africa, Arab States and South Asia. Wageih, Mohamed Ahmed ; Banerjee, Swati ; Millard, Jeremy
  21. The research on the establishment of green Transformation evaluation indicators system. Zhang, Yue; Wang, Hailong
  22. Using Energy Efficiency Indicators of Industrial sub-sectors as metric of process innovations. Mercado Córdova, Jesus A
  23. Measuring Global Innovation Activities with Article Visiting Geographical Data. Wang, Xianwen; Fang, Zhichao; Yang, Yang; Wang, Hongyin; Hu, Zhigang
  24. Public scientists contributing to local literary fiction. An exploratory analysis. Azagra-Caro, Joaquín M.; Robinson-Garcia, Nicolas; Fernández-Mesa, Anabel
  25. Does collaboration facilitate the performance of enterprise innovation?  Lv, Qi; Zhu, Donghua; Huang, Ying; Mitkova, Liliana; Wang, Xuefeng; Ogsuz, Gizem
  26. Structural Analysis of Redundancy Influence of Local Regions in Renewable Energy R&D Projects in Europe. Larruscain-Sarasola, Jaso; Rio Belver, Rosa María; Garechana, Gaizka
  27. The discrepancy of patent citation behavior between examiners and inventors: a citation network analysis. Huang, Ying; Zhu, Donghua; Lv, Qi; Porter, Alan L.; Wang, Xuefeng
  28. How Does Technology Transfer from Universities to Market in China? An Empirical Analysis Based on Invention Patent Assignment. Yang, Yang; Ding, Kun; Zhang, Chunbo; Sun, Xiaoling; Hu, Zhigang
  29. Large Scale Disambiguation of Scientific References in Patent Databases. Zhao, Kangran; Caron, Emiel; Guner, Stanisław  
13:00-14:30 LUNCH
14:30-16:00 Parallel sessions 2
[Room 1] 2.1 Resource distribution and research contents
Chair: Jochen Gläser (Center for Technology and Society TU Berlin. Germany).
  • Unveiling Research Agendas: a study of the influences on research problem selection among academic researchers – Mariela Bianco, Judith Sutz
  • “If we come out with the wrong answer that may affect investments”: Exploring how evaluators were influenced by political considerations during the assessment of societal impact – Gabrielle Samuel , Gemma Derrick
  • Must Metrics Serve the Audit Society? Addressing Marketization in Open Access Publishing and Humanities Analytics – Christopher Newfield, Christopher Muellerleile
  • Allocating organisational level funding on the basis of Research Performance Based assessments, a comparative analysis of the EU Member States in international perspective – Koen Jonkers, Thomas Zacharewicz, Benedetto Lepori, Emanuela Reale
[Room 2] 2.2 Special session on multiplying methods in the field of research evaluation
Chair: Inge van der Weijden (Leiden University. The Netherlands).
Introduction & recap: Gemma Derrick
Provocation: Paul Wouterse
Demonstrations in pairs:
  • Wolfgang Kaltenbrunner & Michael Ochsner
  • Ingeborg Meijer & Irene Ramos Vielba/li>
  • Rogerio Mugnaini & Nadine Desrochers/li>
  • Next steps: Gemma Derrick, Jordi Molas-Gallart and Sarah de Rijcke/li>
[Room 3] 2.3 Special Track 6 · Smart use of indicators for innovation policy.
Chair: Hugo Hollanders & Lili Wang (United Nations University – MERIT. The Netherlands).
  • Evidence-based policy learning: the case of the Research Excellence Indicator – Sjoerd Hardeman, Daniel Vertesy
  • Who sets up the bridge? Tracking scientific collaborations between China and the European Union – Lili Wang
  • A case study about the Colombian Observatory of Science and Technology: between context relevant and internationally comparable indicators – Mónica Salazar
[Room 4] 2.4 Special Track 1 · Data infrastructure and data quality for evolving research metrics.
Chair: Chris Keene. (Head of Library and Scholarly Futures – JISC. UK).
  • Introduction – Chris Keene
  • On the Peripheries of Scholarly Infrastructure: A look at the Journals Using Open Journal Systems – Juan Pablo Alperin, Kevin Stranack, Alex Garnett
  • Why researchers publish in journals not indexed in mainstream databases: training, bridging and gap-filling – Diego Chavarro, Puay Tang, Ismael Rafols
  • Identifying Sources of Scientific Knowledge: classifying non-source items in the WoS – Clara Maria Calero Medina
[Room 5] 2.5 Careers and labour market
Chair: Pablo D’Este (INGENIO, CSIC-UPV. Spain).
  • Developing research career indicators using open data: the RISIS infrastructure – Carolina Cañibano, Richard Woolley, Eric Iversen, Sybille Hinze, Stefan Hornbostel, Jakob Tesch
  • On the extent of researcher mobility and indicators for mobility – Stina Gerdes Barriere
  • Progress on mobility and instability of research personnel in Japan: scientometrics on a job-posting database for monitoring the academic job market – Hirotaka Kawashima, Yasuhiro Yamashita
  • National and international scientific elites: an analysis of Chinese scholars – Fei Shu, Vincent Larivière, Charles-Antoine Julien
[Room 6] 2.6 Gender
Chair: Monica Gaughan (School of Human Evolution and Social Change, Arizona State University. USA).
  • What drives the gender gap in STEM? The SAGA Science, Technology and Innovation Gender Objectives List (STI GOL) as a new approach to linking indicators to STI policies – Ernesto Fernández Polcuch, Martin Schaaper, Alessandro Bello
  • Picking the best publications to showcase graduate courses: Do institutional mechanisms reinforce gender differences?– Jacqueline Leta, Guillaume Cabanac
  • What factors influence scientific and technological output: A comparison of Thailand and Malaysia – Catherine Beaudry, Carl St-Pierre
[Room 7] 2.7 Citation Impact
Chair: Wolfgang Glänze (Wolfgang Glänzel (ECOOM – Centre for Research and Development Monitoring, KU Leuven. Belgium).
  • An approach for the condensed presentation of intuitive citation impact metrics which remain reliable with very few publications – David Campbell, Chantale Tippett, Gregoire Cote, Guillaume Roberge, Eric Archambault
  • A comparison of average-based, percentile rank, and other citation impact indicators – Pedro Albarrán, Javier Ruiz-Castillo
  • How does the scientific progress in developing countries affect bibliometric impact measures of developed countries? A counterfactual case study on China – Stephan Stahlschmidt, Sybille Hinze
  • The returns to scientific specialization – Orion Penner, Gaétan de Rassenfosse
16:00-16:30 COFFEE BREAK
16:30-18:00 2nd plenary session. Roundtable: Infrastructures for Inclusive and Open Science and RISIS presentation
Chair: Ismael Ràfols (INGENIO, CSIC-UPV. Spain).
Éric Archambault (Science-Metrix.  Montréal, Canada).
Chris Keene, (JISC, UK).
Valentin Bogorov (Thomson-Reuters. Moscow, Russia).
Abel Packer (Scielo. Sao Paulo, Brazil).
Hebe Vessuri (IVIC, Venezuela).
Emanuela Reale (IRCRES, CNR, Italy).
18:30-19:00 Transfer to the cocktail site
19:00-21:00 Welcome cocktail [Sant Miquel dels Reis]
September 15
09.00-10.30 Parallel sessions 3
[Room 1] 3.1 Special Track 3 · Measuring diverse research “qualities”: indicators of societal impact, engagement, participation, and local relevance.
Chair: Judith Sutz (Univ. República, Uruguay).
  • Introduction – Judith Sutz
  • ‘Productive interactions’ for societal impact: developing a research information system for agriculture (RIS-Agric) at Stellenbosch University, South Africa – Nelius Boshoff, Harrie Esterhuyse
  • Publication patterns in research underpinning impact in REF2014 – Jonathan Adams
[Room 2 ] 3.2 University-Industry relations.
Chair: Puay Tang (SPRU – Science Policy Research Unit. United Kingdom).
  • Measuring macro-level effects of the global economic recession on university-industry research cooperation – Joaquín M. Azagra-Caro, Robert J.W. Tijssen, Alfredo Yegros Yegros
  • Research and innovation in Lebanon: exploring the indicators & the dynamics of university-industry collaborations in Lebanon – Rula Mae Atweh
  • Traces of academic engagement with industry: insights from Argentina – Luis Gil Abinader, Ana Bossler
  • Mapping private R&D outputs: the contribution of top R&D companies to scientific literature – Roberto Camerani, Daniele Rotolo, Nicola Grassano
[Room 3] 3.3 Special Track 5 · Social sciences and the humanities.
Chair: Thed van Leeuwen (CWTS, Leiden University. The Netherlands).
  • Introduction – Thed N. van Leeuwen
  • Indicators for research performance in the humanities? The scholars’ view on research quality and indicators – Michael Ochsner, Sven E. Hug
  • Lending an ear to SSH @ Vienna University – Juan Gorraiz, Steve Reding, Johannes Sorz, Martin Wieland and Christian
    Gumpenberger
  • Quality criteria and indicators for research in theology – What to do with quantitative measures? – Silvia Martens, Wolfgang Schatz
[Room 4] 3.4 Special Track 1 · Data infrastructure and data quality for evolving research metrics.
Chair: Chris Keene (Head of Library and Scholarly Futures – JISC – United Kingdom).
  • Data quality and consistency in scopus and Web of science in their indexing of Czech Journals – Pavel Mika, Jakub Szarzec, Gunnar Sivertsen
  • Missing citations due to exact reference matching: analysis of a random sample from WoS. Are publications from peripheral countries disadvantaged? – Paul Donner
  • Funding acknowledgements in the Web of science: inconsistencies in data collection and standardization of funding organizations – Jeroen van Honk, Rodrigo Costas, Clara Calero-Medina
  • Open data in global environmental change: findings from the community – Birgit Schmidt

[Room 5]

 

3.5 Special Track 2 · International benchmarking of innovation: challenges and adequacy for developing and developed regions.
Chair: Luciana Marins (UNESCO Institute of Statistics, Canada).
  • Introduction – Luciana Marins
  • The impact of methodology in innovation measurement – Espen Solberg, Lars Wilhelmsen, Markus Bugge
  • A critical assessment of the quality and validity of composite indicators of innovation – Daniel Vertesy
  • Innovation strategies in Latin American firms – Fernando Vargas
[Room 6] 3.6 Gender.
Chair: Jacqueline Leta (Instituto de Bioquímica Medica. Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro. Brazil).
  • Identifying the gender dimension in research content – Chantale Tippett, David Campbell, Bastien St. Louis Lalonde, Eric Archambault, Julie Callaert, Katerina Mantouvalou, Lucy Arora
  • Gender differences in synchronous and diachronous self-citations – Gita Ghiasi, Vincent Larivière, Cassidy Sugimoto
  • Mapping the author gender-distribution of disease-specific medical research – Jens Peter Andersen, Jesper Wiborg Schneider, Mathias Wullum Nielsen
  • Indicators for constructing scintific excellence: “Indipendence” in the ERC starting grant – Helene Schiffbaenker, Florian Holzinger
[Room 7] 3.7 Citation Impact.
Chair: Erjia Yan (Drexel University. USA) .
  • A comparison of the Web of science with publication-level classification systems of science – Antonio Perianes-Rodriguez, Javier Ruiz-Castillo
  • Ranking journals using social choice theory methods: a novel approach in bibliometrics – Fuad Aleskerov, Vladimir Pislyakov, Andrey Subochev
  • The performance and trend of China’s academic disciplines from 2006 to 2014 – Zhigang Hu
  • Comparing absolute and normalized indicators in scientific collaboration: a study in Environmental Science in Latin America – Maria Cláudia Cabrini Grácio, Ely Francina Tannuri de Oliveira
10.30-11.00 COFFEE BREAK
11.00-12.30 Parallel sessions 4
[Room 1] 4.1 Special Globelics session on Lessons learned for priority setting and indicators relevant to the impact of research programmes in Europe and Emerging Economies. An evidence-based debate between the research and the policy-shaping community.
Chair: Yannis Caloghirou (National Technical University of Athens, Greece) Nicholas Vonortas (George Washington University. USA).
  • Thirty years of European Collaboration in Research and Development: Policy-driven Research Networking and the presence of new knowledge-intensive entrepreneurial ventures. Yannis Caloghirou, Aimilia Protogerou and Evangelos Siokas
  • STI Indicators for Emerging Economies: Experiences from Chile, Brazil and Peru. Adriana Bin, Sergio Salles-Filho, Ana Maria Carneiro, Nicholas Vonortas, Juan Ernesto Sepulveda Alonso and Paula Felicio Drummond de Castro
  • Use of indicators for research and policy impact evaluation: evidence from Russia. Konstantin Fursov and Stanislav Zaichenko
[Room 2] 4.2 Special Track 3 · Measuring diverse research “qualities”: indicators of societal impact, engagement, participation, and local relevance.
Chair: Judith Sutz (Univ. República, Uruguay).
  • Societal impact metrics for non-patentable research in dentistry – Diana Hicks, Kim Isett, Julia Melkers, Le Song, Rakshit Trivedi
  • The Evolution of Scientific Trajectories in Rice: Mapping the Relation between Research and Societal Priorities – Tommaso Ciarli, Ismael Rafols
  • Research Quality Plus (RQ+) A Holistic Approach to Evaluating Research – Robert McLean, Osvaldo Feinstein
[Room 3] 4.3 Special Track 5 · Social sciences and the humanities.
Chair: Thed van Leeuwen (CWTS, Leiden University. The Netherlands).
  • The micropolitics of quantifying research output for evaluation in Dutch law schools –  Wolfgang Kaltenbrunner, Sarah de Rijcke
  • Social Impact Open Repository (SIOR). Transforming the peripheral space of social impact of research – Mar Joanpere, Elvira Samano, Aitor Gómez
  • Je veux bien, mais me citerez-vous? On publication language strategies in an anglicized research landscape – Nadine Desrochers, Vincent Larivière
  • Effects of performance-based research funding on publication patterns in the social sciences and humanities – Raf Guns, Tim Engels
[Room 4] 4.4 Indicators and infrastructure.
Chair: Eric Archambault (Science-Metrix. Canada).
  • Examining data access and use in science – Erjia Yan, Mengnan Zhao
  • SMS: a linked open data infrastructure for science and innovation studies – Peter Van den Besselaar, Ali Khalili, Al Idrissou, Antonis Loizou, Stefan Schlobach, Frank Van Harmelen
  • Data Citation Policies of Data Providers within the scope of Longitudinal Studies in Life Course Research –  Anke Reinhold, Marc Rittberger, Nadine Mahrholz
  • Stepping up Information Infrastructures and Statistical Reporting – Monitoring the German Excellence Initiative – Anke Reinhardt
[Room 5] 4.5 Special Track 2 · International benchmarking of innovation: challenges and adequacy for developing and developed regions.
Chair: Luciana Marins (UNESCO Institute of Statistics, Canada).
  • Innovation dynamics of Salvadoran agro-food industry from an evolutionary perspective – Elías Humberto Peraza Castaneda, Guillermo Aleixandre Mendizábal
  • Elucidate Innovation Performance of Technology-driven Mergers and Acquisitions – Lu Huang, Kangrui Wang, Huizhu Yu, Lining Shang, Liliana Mitkova
  • Measuring Innovation in Governments: Case Study of the UAE – Sami Mahroum, Yasser Al-Saleh, Shatha Al Hashmi
[Room 6] 4.6 Society, participation and culture.
Chair: Julia Melkers (Georgia Institute of Technology. Atlanta, USA).
  • Indicators for Assessing Responsible Research and Innovation Governance – Gonzalo Ordonez-Matamoros, Stefan Kuhlmann
  • Operationalizing RRI: Relational Quality Assessment & Management Model for Research and Innovation Networks (REQUANET) – Julieta Barrenechea, Andoni Ibarra
  • What knowledge counts? Insights from an action research project using participatory video with grassroots innovation experiences – Alejandra Boni, Monique Leivas, Alba Talón, Teresa De la Fuente, Victoria Pellicer-Sifres, Sergio Belda-Miquel, Aurora López-Fogués, Begoña Arias
  • A proposal for measurement of science and innovation culture – Asako Okamura
[Room 7] 4.7 Individual Performance.
Chair: María Bordons (Instituto de Filosofía, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas. Spain).
  • Information sources – information targets: evaluative aspects of the scientists’ publication strategies – Wolfgang Glanzel, Pei-Shan Chi, Christian Gumpenberger, Juan Gorraiz
  • How research funding affects research time and academic productivity: Evidence from university faculties in China – Xi Yang
  • The Effect of Holding a Research Chair on Scientists’ Impact – Seyed Reza Mirnezami, Catherine Beaudry
  • Public-private collaboration and scientific impact: an analysis at the level of the individual researcher. Carter Bloch, Thomas K. Ryan, Jens Peter Andersen
[Room 8] 4.8 Funding and EU collaboration.
Chair: Philippe Larédo (Université Paris-Est, Ecole des Ponts, IFRIS, Institut Francilien, Recherche, Innovation et Société. France).
  • Examining to What Extent Does the Source of Funding Matter for Scientific Impact. A Case Study of Danish EU FP7 Funded Projects – Thomas Kjeldager Ryan, Jesper Wiborg Schneider
  • The Determinants of National Funding in Trans-national Joint Research: Exploring the Proximity Dimensions – Emanuela Reale, Andrea Orazio Spinello, Antonio Zinilli
  • Beyond funding: What can acknowledgements reveal about credit distribution in science? — Adèle Paul-Hus, Adrián A. Díaz-Faes, Nadine Desrochers, Rodrigo Costas, Maxime Sainte-Marie, Benoît Macaluso and Vincent Larivière
12.30-13.30 3rd plenary session. Roundtable: Global collaboration networks: flat world or centre-periphery structure?
Chair: Richard Woolley (INGENIO, CSIC-UPV. Spain).
Jonathan Adams, Digital Science, London, UK
Rigas Arvanitis, director of IFRIS, IRD, Paris, France
Sami Mahroum, INSEAD Innovation and Policy Initiative, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates
Mónica Salazar, InterAmerican Develoment Bank, Bogota, Colombia
13.30-14.30 LUNCH
 14:30-16:00 Parallel sessions 5

[Room 1]

 

5.1 Special Track 5 · Social sciences and the humanities.
Chair: Thed van Leeuwen (CWTS, Leiden University. The Netherlands).
  • Developing appropriate methods and indicators for evaluation of research in the social sciences and humanities. Presentation of a new COST Action –  Jack Spaapen, Gunnar Sivertsen, Michael Ochsner, Julia Melkers, Tim Engels
[Room 2] 5.2 Special Track 3 · Measuring diverse research “qualities”: indicators of societal impact, engagement, participation, and local relevance.
Chair: Judith Sutz (Univ. República, Uruguay).
  • Impact of Research on Development in Cameroon: convergence between supply and research needs in the food sector – Minkoua Jules René, Ludovic Temple
  • Monitoring the Evolution and Benefits of Responsible Research and Innovation (MoRRI) – a preliminary framework for measuring RRI dimensions – Niels Mejlgaard, Susanne Buehrer, Erich Griessler, Ralf Lindner, Nikos Maroulis, Ingeborg Meijer, Viola Peter, Ismael Rafols, Tine Ravn, Jack Stilgoe, Lena Tsipouri, Richard Woolley, Angela Wroblewski
  • “All this grassroots, real life knowledge”: Comparing perceived with realised concerns of including non-academic evaluators in societal impact assessment – Gemma Derrick, Gabrielle Samuel
[Room 3] 5.3 Special Session on Predicting STEM Career Success by STI Knowledge Utilization Patterns.
Chair: Barry Bozeman (Center for Organization Research and Design, Arizona State Unviersity. USA), Jan Youtie (Georgia Institute of Technology. USA).
  • Career Impacts of Cosmopolitan Collaboration. Barry Bozeman, Monica Gaughan
  • Bounded Collaboration and Changing Core-Periphery Relationships in Sino-Russian Scientific Co-Production. Abdullah Gök, Maria Karaulova, Philip Shapira
  • Going home: why do non-US citizens with US Ph.D. degrees return home? Stuart Bretschneider
  • The credibility of policy reporting across learning disciplines. Jan Youtie
[Room 4] 5.4 Special Session on Performance indicators for areas of innovation: international perspective
Chair: Guilherme Ary Plonski (Faculdade de Economia, Administração e Contabilidade (FEA), Universidade de Sao Paulo, Brazil).
  • A case study of Be’er Sheva Advanced Technology Park (ATP) in Israel. Daphne Getz, Eliezer Shein
  • Porto Digital: an area of innovation as a lever to transform Recife in Brazil. Guilherme Ary Plonski, Désirée M. Zouain
  • The influence of Science and Technology parks in Spain. Andres Barge-Gil, Aurelia Modrego Rico
[Room 5] 5.5 Mission Oriented Research Health.
Chair: Sandro Mendonça (ISCTE Business School. Portugal).
  • Using novel computer-assisted linguistic analysis techniques to assess the timeliness and impact of FP7 Health’s research– Vilius Stanciauskas
  • Professional impact –  Gustaf Nelhans
  • Technology push / market pull indicators in healthcare – Irina Efimenko, Vladimir Khoroshevsky, Ed Noyons, Evgeny Nochevkin
  • Mapping the networks of cancer research in Portugal (1990-2015): initial results – Oriana Rainho Brás, Jean-Philippe Cointet, João Arriscado Nunes, Leonor David, Alberto Cambrosio
[Room 6] 5.6 Text analysis.
Chair: Stefan Hornbostel (Institut für Sozialwissenschaften der Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin. Germany).
  • Breakout discoveries in science: what do they have in common? – Jos Winnink, Robert J.W. Tijssen, Anthony F.J. van Raan
  • From university research to innovation – detecting knowledge transfer via text mining– Sabrina Larissa Woltmann, Line H. Clemmensen, Lars Alkærsig
  • Predicting panel scores by linguistic analysis– Peter Van den Besselaar
[Room 7] 5.7 Altmetrics.
Chair: Stefanie Haustein (Université de Montréal. Canada).
  • Article-level metrics and the periphery: an exploration of articles by Brazilian authors – Iara Vidal Pereira de Souza, Fabio Castro Gouveia
  • Can we use altmetrics at the institutional level? A case study analysing the coverage by research areas of four Spanish universities – Daniel Torres-Salinas, Nicolas Robinson-Garcia, Evaristo Jiménez-Contreras
  • Enhancing methodology of altmetrics studies by exploring social media metrics for Economic and Business Studies journals – Kaltrina Nuredini, Isabella Peters
  • Comparative study of Colombian Researchers according to data from Google Scholar, ResearchGate and the National System for Measurement Science (Colciencias) – Isidro F Aguillo, Alejandro Uribe-Tirado Uribe-Tirado, Wilson López
16:00-16:30 COFFEE BREAK
16:30-18:00 Parallel sessions 6
[Room 1] 6.1 Altmetrics – Panel.
Chair: James Wilsdon (University of Sheffield. United Kingdom).
Roundtable next-generation metrics: responsible metrics & evaluation for open science – James Wilsdon, Judit Bar-Ilan, Isabella Peters, Paul Wouters
[Room 2] 6.2 Geography and performance.
Chair: Michael J Kahn (University of the Western Cape. South Africa).
  • Indicators of the knowledge based society: Comparison between European and Latin American countries – Daniel Villavicencio
  •  Measuring cross-border regional STI integration – Teemu Makkonen
  • From emerging country to a leading role in the scientific and technological field? analysis of the internationalization of Brazil – Claudia Daniele de Souza, Daniela De Filippo, Elias Sanz Casado
[Room 3] 6.3 Special Track 5 – Social sciences and the humanities.
Chair: Thed van Leeuwen (CWTS, Leiden University. The Netherlands).
  • Clashing Conventions? Exploring Human Resource Management in the Cleavage Between Academic Field Traditions and New Institutional Rules. Quantitative and Qualitative Insights from the Field of Communication and Media Studies in Switzerland – Alexander Buhmann, Benedetto Lepori, Diana Ingenhoff.
  • A bibliometric indicator with a balanced representation of all fields – Gunnar Sivertsen
  • Measuring research in humanities and social sciences: information from a new Italian data infrastructure – Marco Malgarini, Tindaro Cicero
  • Trends and developments in multi-authorship in five social science disciplines from 1991 to 2014 – Sabrina Jasmin Mayer
[Room 4] 6.4 Special Track 4 · Collaborations, mobility and internationalization.
Chair: Rigas Arvanitis (IFRIS, IRD, France).
  • Introduction: Rigas Arvanitis
  • An approach to the analysis of human resources: mobility and collaboration in knowledge production by Colombian universities – Sandra Carolina Rivera Torres
  • Mobility in the academic careers at the flemish universities – Results from the human resources in research database – Noëmi Frea Debacker, Karen Vandevelde
  • Gatekeeping African studies: A preliminary insight on what do editorial boards indicate about the nature and structure of research brokerage – Sandro Mendonça
[Room 5] 6.5 Mission Oriented Research – Health.
Chair: Matthew Wallace (Canada Foundation for Innovation. Canada).
  • Access to global health research. Prevalence and cost of gold and hybrid open access – Stefanie Haustein, Elise Smith, Philippe Mongeon, Fei Shu, Vincent Larivière
  •  Scientific research on diseases: the distinct profile of developed and developing countries – Alfredo Yegros
  • Biodiversity sustainability of phytomedicine research:a 3-dimensions analysis around the North-South divide – Philippe Gorry
  • In Re the academic cartography of sugar sweetened beverages: scientific and technical information, interdisciplinarity, and legal academia – Lexi C. White
[Room 6] 6.6 Project and programme assessment.
Chair: Diana Hicks (Georgia Institute of Technology. USA).
  • An assessment of EU-funded research projects: innovators and their innovative potential – Daniel Nepelski, Vincent Van Roy, Eoghan O’neill
  • Evaluating the impact of public space investments with limited time and funds: (methodological) lessons from a Swiss case study –  Franz Barjak
  • Researchers and institutions in the periphery: challenges in measuring research capacity for geographically specific programs in the U.S – Julia Melkers
  • Assessing marine biotechnology research centres in peripheral regions: developing global and local STI indicators – Antoine Schoen, Douglas Robinson
[Room 7] 6.7 Measuring Innovation.
Chair: Joaquín M. Azagra-Caro (INGENIO, CSIC-UPV. Spain).
  • Baseline of indicators for R&D and Innovation in ICT: a tool for decision-making, design and monitoring of public policies – Henry Mora Holguín, Diana Lucio-Arias, Sandra Zárate, Nayibe Castro,  Clara Pardo
  • Measuring originality: common patterns of invention in research and technology organizations – David Li Tang, Erica Wiseman, Tamara Keating, Jean Archambeault
  • Linking international trademark databases to inform IP research and policy – Stephen Michael Petrie
  • Detecting emerging trends and country specializations in energy efficiency – Daniela De Filippo, Andres Pandiella-Dominique
18:00-19:30
[Room 1]
ENID General Assembly
18:00-19:30
[Room 2]
Special session organised by the Organización de Estados Iberoamericanos OEI – Ciencia, Tecnología, Sociedad e Innovación ¿Medimos lo que debemos?¿Medimos bien?.
Chair: Manuel Torralbo  (Junta de Andalucía. Spain).
Judith Sutz (Univ. República, Uruguay), Hebe Vessuri (CONICET. Argentina), José Navarrete – (Junta de Andalucía. Spain).
“this special session is in spanish”
19:30-20:00 Transfer to the conference dinner (participants OEI event and ENID Assembly)
20:00-22:00 CONFERENCE DINNER (Hotel Astoria)

September 16
09.00-10.30 4th Plenary session.
Keynote LectureThe deep structure of STI indicators: Contextual knowledge and scientometrics
Prof. Johann Mouton – Stellenbosch University, South Africa
Chair: Philippe Laredo (Philippe Larédo (Université Paris-Est, Ecole des Ponts, IFRIS, Institut Francilien, Recherche, Innovation et Société. France).
10.30-11.00 COFFEE BREAK
11.00-12.30 Parallel sessions 7
[Room 1] 7.1 Innovation in Government.
Chair: Sami Mahroum (INSEAD Innovation and Policy Initiative.United Arab Emirates).
Special session roundtable on Measuring Innovation in Government, Anthony Arundel, Carter Bloch, Ilka Lakaniemi, Sami Mahroum
[Room 2] 7.2 Mission Oriented Research – Agriculture.
Chair: Ilkay Holt (FAO, United Nations. United Kingdom).
Special panel on Metrics and Agricultural Science measuring Multidisciplinary and Applied Research –  Imma Subirats Coll, Vanessa Méry, Hugo Besemer, Ellen Fest, Fabrizio Celli
[Room 3] 7.3 Special Track 5 · Social sciences and the humanities.
Chair: Thed van Leeuwen (CWTS, Leiden University. The Netherlands).
  • ERIH PLUS – Making the SSH visible, searchable and available – Gry Ane Vikanes Lavik, Gunnar Sivertsen
  • Indexed University presses: overlap and geographical distribution in five book assessment databases –  Jorge Mañana-Rodríguez, Elea Giménez-Toledo
  • East-African Social Sciences and Humanities Publishing – A Handmade Bibliometrics Approach – Nora Schmidt
  • Alphabetical co-authorship in the social sciences and humanities: evidence from a comprehensive local database – Raf Guns
[Room 4] 7.4 Special Track 4 · Collaborations, mobility and internationalization.
Chair: Rigas Arvanitis (IFRIS, IRD, France).
  • Scientific mobility of Early Career Researchers in Spain and The Netherlands through their publications – Nicolas Robinson-Garcia, Carolina Cañibano, Richard Woolley, Rodrigo Costas
  • The network of international student mobility – Eva Maria Voegtle, Michael Windzio
  • Big Science, co-publication and collaboration: getting to the core – Michael J Kahn
  • Autonomy vs. dependency of scientific collaboration in scientific performance – Zaida Chinchilla-Rodríguez, Sandra Miguel, Antonio Perianes-Rodríguez, María-Antonia Ovalle-Perandones, Carlos Olmeda-Gómez
[Room 5] 7.5 Culture and engagement.
Chair: Denis Gray (North Carolina State University. USA).
  • Scientific culture in Colombia. A proposal of an indicator system for science, technology and innovation – Clara Pardo, William Alfonso
  • How user-innovators can be identified? Evidence collected from the analysis of practices – Konstantin Fursov
  • Assessing youth engagement with a collaborative Index – Ramon Marrades
[Room 6] 7.6 Networks.
Chair: Ludo Waltman (CWTS,  Leiden University. The Netherlands).
  • Networks dynamics in the case of emerging technologies – Daniele Rotolo
  • Using network centrality measures to improve national journal classification lists – A. Zuccala, N. Robinson-Garcia, R. Repiso, D. Torres-Salinas.
  • Bridging centrality: A new indicator to measure the positioning of actors in R&D networks – Thomas Scherngell, Laurent Berge, Iris Wanzenböck
  • Network heterogeneity in an undirected network – Xiaojun Hu, Loet Leydesdorff, Ronald Rousseau
[Room 7] 7.7 Altmetrics.
Chair: Juan Pablo Alperín (Canadian Institute for Studies in Publishing, Simon Fraser University. Canada).
  • A Systematic Identification of Scientists on Twitter – Qing Ke, Yong-Yeol Ahn, Cassidy R. Sugimoto
  • Do Mendeley reader counts reflect the scholarly impact of conference papers? A comparison between ComputerScience and Engineering field.  – Kuku Joseph Aduku, Mike Thelwall, Kayvan Kousha
  • Currencies of science: discussing disciplinary “exchange rates” for citations and Mendeley readership – Rodrigo Costas, Antonio Perianes-Rodríguez, Javier Ruiz-Castillo
  • SSH & the City. A Network Approach for Tracing the Societal Contribution of the Social Sciences and Humanities for Local Development – Nicolas Robinson-Garcia, Thed N. van Leeuwen, Ismael Rafols
12.30-14.30
Posters session 2.
click to see
  1. Quantifying and visualizing different types of scientific collaboration in Nanoscience and Nanotechnology field. Chinchilla-Rodríguez, Zaida; Miguel, Sandra; Perianes-Rodríguez, Antonio Olmeda-Gómez, Carlos, Ovalle Perandones, María-Antonia
  2.  A comparative study of the evolution of co-authorship network in Danish Political Science and Economics. Henriksen, Dorte
  3.  Internal Migration of Scientists in Russia and the USA: the Case of Physicists. Dyachenko, Ekaterina
  4. The Global Research Identifier Database GRID – Persistent IDs for the World’s Research Organisations. Szomszor, Martin; Mori, Andres
  5. Differential Effects of Scopus vs. Web of Science on University Rankings: A Case Study of German Universities. Horstmann, Wolfram; Schmidt, Birgit
  6. On the normalization of citation impact based on the Essential Science Indicators classification of Thomson Reuters. Baranova, Olga; Peris, Alfred
  7. Rock around the clock? Exploring scholars’ downloading patterns. Cameron-Pesant, Sarah; Jansen, Yorrick; Larivière, Vincent
  8. Research leadership in key fields for emerging and developing countries. González-Alcaide, Gregorio; Huamaní, Charles; Park, Jinseo
  9. Mass Gathering as an emerging field: a co-citation analysis. González-Alcaide, Gregorio; Llorente, Pedro; Ramos, José M.
  10. Detecting and Tracking Real-time Hot Topics Using WoS Usage Count: A Study on Computational Neuroscience. Fang, Zhichao; Wang, Xianwen; Hu, Zhigang
  11. Research Activity Classification based on Time Series Bibliometrics. Kawamura, Takahiro; Yamashita, Yasuhiro
  12. Inclusion of Gender perspective in scientific publications in Energy Efficiency. Mauleón, Elba; De Filippo , Daniela
  13. Gender-based differences in German-language publications. Mayer, Sabrina;
  14. Scientific productivity and the impact of neurosurgery scientists in WOS and Mendeley: a gender study. Sotudeh, Hajar; Dehdarirad, Tahereh; Pooladian, Aida
  15. Changes in gender representation in scholarly publications in criminology along five decades. Kenig, Yuval; Yitzhaki, Moshe
  16. Identifying journal articles based on fake dissertations as a tool to detect predatory scientific journals. Abalkina, Anna; Rostovtsev, Andrey; Kostinskiy, Alexander
  17. How is the counting method for a publication or citation indicator chosen? Gauffriau, Marianne
  18. The occurrence areas of the dependence problem of the h-index. Liu, Chichen; Cai, Sanfa ; Liu, Yuxian
  19. Multivariate bibliometric analysis of scientific production indicators: a taxonomy of countries scientific degree of centrality. Silva, Deise D.; Grácio, Maria C. C.
  20. Uncriticized citation process of the indicators like social contagion – a case  study of the success rate of commercialization of the public R&D in South Korea, Park,  Jinseo; Kim, Sun-Woo; Lee, June Young; Song, Tae Ho
  21. A comparative analysis of Western Europe and Latin America based on social and scientific indicators. Castanha, Renata; Grácio, Maria C. C.
  22. Indicators of endogamy and reciprocity in PhD theses assessments. Castelló-Cogollos, Lourdes; Aleixandre Benavent, Rafael; Castelló-Cogollos, Rafael
  23. Scientific Impact Indicators: a comparative study of Brazilian journals’ impact factors. Almeida, Catia C.; Grácio, Maria C. C.
  24. Methodological problems of comparative analysis of statistical indicators in the post-Soviet states. Yegorov, Igor
  25. Science education course for primary education students.Costa, Tânia Lima; Poenaru, Lara
  26. Sub-fields of Library and Information Science in Turkey: A Visualization Study. Taşkın, Zehra; Doğan, Güleda; Al, Umut
  27. Content words as measure of structure in the science space. Lamers, Wout S.
  28. Study on the International and Domestic Subject Areas’ Distributions. Wenjie, Wei; Junlan, Yao; Liu, Yuxian
  29. Characteristics of Paper Publication by Major Countries Focusing on Journals. Fukuzawa, Naomi
  30. 4D Specialty Approximation: Ability to Distinguish between Related Specialties. Rons, Nadine
  31. Analysis of Structure of Scientific Publications at Universities Focusing on Sub-Organizations. Murakami, Akiyoshi; Saka, Ayaka; Igami, Masatsura
 13:00-14:30 LUNCH
 14:30-16:00 Parallel sessions 8
[Room 1] 8.1 Indicators’ use and effects.
Chair: Paul Wouters (CWTS, Leiden University. The Netherlands).
  • Why DORA does not stand a chance in the biosciences – Jochen Gläser
  • Are institutional missions aligned with journal-based or document-based disciplinary structures? “ Richard Klavans, Kevin Boyack
  • Science policy through stimulating scholarly output Does is work? – Peter Van den Besselaar
  • The need for contextualized scientometric analysis: An opinion pape – Ludo Waltman
[Room 2] 8.2 National systems in the periphery.
Chair: Daniel Villavicencio (Metropolitan Autonomous University Mexico. Mexico).
  • Measuring internationality without bias against the periphery –  Valeria Aman
  • Indicators on measuring technology convergence worldwide – Chunjuan LUAN
  • Development on the Periphery: monitoring science, technology and innovation for sustainable development among Pacific Island Countries – Tim Turpin, Ranasinghe Wasantha Amaradasa
  • Fake Academic Degrees as an Indicator for Severe Reputation Crisis in the Scientific Community – Andrey Rostovtsev, Alexander Kostinskiy
[Room 3] 8.3 Special Track 5 · Social sciences and the humanities.
Chair: Thed van Leeuwen (CWTS, Leiden University).
A special debate on
Aligning research assessment in the Humanities to the national Standard Evaluation Protocol Challenges and developments in the Dutch research landscape – 
 Gunnar Sivertsen, Sarah de Rijcke, Tim Engels
[Room 4] 8.4 Special Track 4 · Collaborations, mobility and internationalization.
Chair: Rigas Arvanitis (IFRIS, IRD, France)
  • The world network of scientific collaborations between cities: domestic or international dynamics? – Marion Maisonobe, Denis Eckert, Michel Grossetti, Laurent Jégou, Béatrice Milard
  • Trends in the inter-regional and international research collaboration of the PRC’s regions: 2000-2015 – Marc Luwel, Erik van Wijk, Lambertus (Bert) J van der Wurff, Lili Wang
  • Iran’s scientific dominance and the emergence of South-East Asian countries in the Arab Gulf Region – Henk F. Moed
  • How international is internationally collaborated research? A bibliometric study of Russian surname holder collaboration networks – Maria Karaulova, Abdullah Gök and Philip Shapira
[Room 5] 8.5 Mission-Oriented Research-Health.
Chair: Tommaso Ciarli (SPRU, University of Sussex. United Kingdom).
  • Network analysis to support research management: evidence from the Fiocruz Observatory in Science, Technology and Innovation in Health – Bruna de Paula Fonseca e Fonseca Fonseca, Ricardo Barros Sampaio, Marcus Vinicius Pereira da Silva, Paula Xavier dos Santos
  • Partial alphabetical authorship in medical research: an exploratory analysis – Philippe Mongeon, Elise Smith, Bruno Joyal, Vincent Larivière
  • The bibliometric behaviour of an expanding specialisation of medical research – Jonathan Levitt, Mike Thelwall
[Room 6] 8.6 Special sesión on Scientific Culture Measures. Challenges and New Perspectives
  • Presentation / Introduction to the topic: What is scientific culture and what is not? – José Antonio López Cerezo
  • What does it mean to be scientifically literate? – Belén Laspra
  • New tools and indicators to measure scientific culture – Ana Muñoz van den Eynde
  • New cultural factors influencing the innovation measures – María Cornejo Cañamares
[Room 7] 8.7 Altmetrics.
Chair: Rodrigo Costas (CWTS, Leiden University.  The Netherlands).
  • Comparing the characteristics of highly cited titles and highly alted titles – Fereshteh Didegah, Timothy D. Bowman, Sarah Bowman, James Hartley
  • What makes papers visible on social media? An analysis of various document characteristics – Zohreh Zahedi, Rodrigo Costas, Vincent Lariviere, Stefanie Haustein
  • Normalization of Mendeley reader impact on the reader- and paper-side – Robin Haunschild, Lutz Bornmann
16:00-16:30 COFFEE BREAK
16:30-18:00 5th Plenary roundtable: Use of indicators in policy and inclusive metrics.
Chair: Jordi Molas-Gallart (INGENIO, CSIC-UPV. Spain).
Richard Deiss , Directorate General for Research and Innovation, European Commission
Diana Hicks, Georgia Tech, Atlanta, US
Slavo Radosevic, UCL, London, UK
Judith Sutz, President of Globelics & Univ. de la República, Montevideo, Uruguay
18:15-19:30 STI2016 Fringe. An open session on local examples of participatory research
  • Video presentations
  • A roundtable on quality criteria and indicators for Participatory Action Research.
    Sandra Boni, Ramon Marrades and local Valencian activists.
18:30-22:30 CLOSING COCKTAIL & MUSIC